Saturday, November 22, 2014

Hasselback Potatoes

Hasselback Potatoes with Parmesan and Roasted Garlic
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes
Yield: 6 to 8 Servings
Ingredients
  • 6 to 7 large red potatoes
  • 5 to 6 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 1/2 cup butter, cubed
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Brush bottom and sides of a baking dish or cast iron skillet with olive oil.
  2. Using a mandoline or a sharp knife, slice potatoes crosswise into desired thickness. Arrange potato slices vertically and loosely in prepared dish or skillet.
  3. Sprinkle garlic and Italian seasoning on top of potatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Dot potatoes with butter. Cover skillet or dish with foil and bake in a 375 F oven for about 1 hour or until potatoes are tender. Remove foil, sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and bake for another 15 to 20 minutes or until crisp.
Notes
I sliced my potatoes at about 1/4 inch thick as I like my potatoes "meaty". The thinner the slice, the crispier the potatoes get.

Who else cries when yellows drop


November Ends for Belle and Eddie
@Nancy May Boldt Ogden White Battersby Vicknair
Who else cries when yellows
drop/

all finished with their 
duties.
  1. Pulled up the mums
  2. Swept front porch
  3. Burned the leaves
  4. Make final arrangements = done
  5. Rake, raked
  6. put up the wreath 


Anapanasati Sutta Alameda Sangha

Dear Friends,
This Sunday 11/23, I'll be presenting an overview of the Anapanasati Sutta, one of the central teachings of the Theravadan Buddhist tradition.  On first glance, this sutta seems to be very simply about breath meditation.  But on more in depth study,  it is clear the Buddha meant this teaching to be an encapsulation of the entire path. Because of the context in which this teaching was given, we can deduce that the Buddha was quite well along in his teaching career, and that maturity is reflected in the beautiful way this sutta is structured.  

Come learn how the Buddha taught us to use simple breath practice to lead all the way to liberation through non-clinging.

Judi Fruge will also be continuing our wonderful series of classes in American Sign Language, starting at 6 p.m.

Looking forward to learning and practicing together.
with warmth,
Deb Kerr

--
Alameda Sangha
Every Sunday, 7pm
@ Buena Vista United Methodist Church
2311 Buena Vista Ave., Alameda
Visit our Website: https://sites.google.com/site/alamedasangha/
Visit our blog: http://alamedasanghablog.blogspot.com/

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Golden Gate Boys Choir & Bellringers From Advent to Christmas Concert

Golden Gate Boys Choir & Bellringers
From Advent to Christmas Concert
2:00 p.m. Sunday, December 7
Chapel of Carmelite Monastery of Cristo Rey, 721 Parker Ave, SF
A free will offering will be taken at the door.  The program performed by the Golden Gate Boys Choir will consist of organ, handbell and choral music appropriate to the Advent and Christmas Seasons.
http://www.ggbc.org/GGBCBR@aol.com
http://www.ggbc.org/

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Edwin White Timeline

Edwin White Timeline
1817 Born South Hadley Mass
    Parents
   ?Census
   ?School
   ?College
 
1836
ca 18 years old
1835 or 837 startd (metropolitan)Hartford Ct Studied under Phillip Hewins
1840 Living in Bridgeport
Exhibited

1841
Began studying at the prestigious National Academy of Design in New York with John Rubens Smith
Married Harriet Hinman Allen Bridgeport CT
Anatomy classes

1848 Elected to Acad of Design

1850
In 1850, White took his first trip to Europe where he studied at the Academie des Beaux-Arts in Paris under François Edouard Picot, and continued on to Germany to study with Karl Wilhelm Hübner.
-Bulletin of the American Art Union

1852 Dusseldorf
1855 The Antiquitary

1855 Returns to USA

Paris working on Washington Resigning
Also has Hugenots with him
Sanford Gifford described him in a letter to his father as “a most amiable man as well as an excellent artist.”[5]  Excerpt of an article from an art journal tracking the progress of Washington Resigning. "Foreign Correspondence Items," The Crayon, April 1858.
Cbanoh, iu Paris, now occupies the studio lately vacated by 
Edwin White. H
1857-59 Paris

July 1859 Returns to NYC
August 1859 Painting finished in New York

Art journals very closely followed the painting’s progress. The Crayon provided one of the most detailed descriptions of Washington Resigning right after its completion: "The artist has managed a difficult subject very successfully...By making us feel the interest which the figures themselves take in the proceeding before us, all eyes being fixed on Washington, he has succeeded in impressing us with the solemnity of an important event in our national history. We have no doubt but that Washington Resigning His Commission will give perfect satisfaction to the people of Maryland, and take rank with the best efforts of its class."[6]


The Baltimore Sun reported that the painting “elicited a diversity of sentiment as to its merits, but comments thereon are generally disparaging.”[8]

[1] "Maryland Legislature," Baltimore Sun, January 1858.
[2] “The New Painting for the Capitol of Maryland,” Baltimore Sun, 20 May 1857.
[3] Kellogg, Allyn S. Memorials of Elder John White one of the first settlers of Hartford, Conn., and of his Descendants, Hartford: Case, Lockwood, and Company: 1860, p.254.
[4] New York Historical Society. Records of the American Art-Union, 23 March 1851, "Letters from Artists," MS 12. See reel 7, #32.
[5] Sanford Robinson Gifford papers, 1840s-1900, circa 1960s-1970s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 8 October 1855.
[6] "Sketchings," The Crayon, October 1859.
[7] Comptroller of the Treasury (Paying Warrants), 1859-1860, MSA S 703-14, MSA S 703-15.
[8] "Letter from the State Capital," Baltimore Sun, 24 December 1859.


1867-69
-Henry Tuckerman Book of the Artists List and bio
Visiting Lecturer
cite The Art  Idea

1869
Antwerp
Florence until 1875

Death
1877 7 Jun Age: 60
Saratoga Springs, Saratoga, New York, USA

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Baltimore’s Frame Maker: Samson Cariss

Baltimore’s Frame Maker: Samson Cariss and Washington Resigning

http://marylandstatehouse.blogspot.com/ 

This time last year, we watched Edwin White’s Washington Resigning His Commission leave the State House to undergo conservation as part of the restoration, and marked the occasion with a feature on the nineteenth-century artist. So, what better way to welcome Washington Resigning home in the coming weeks, than with a feature on the frame’s craftsman, Samson Cariss!

2014_11_7_img2.jpg
The frame's latest conservation has revealed superb, detailed craftsmanship and generous gilding. Maryland State Archives, 9 June 2014.

At first glance, Cariss may not seem of interest. Compared to White’s popularity in the American artistic expat inner-circle, Cariss appears only in passing in state correspondence, and it was even questioned for a time whether he could have made the elaborate, carefully crafted frame that has miraculously stayed with the painting over the course of nearly a century and a half. Compared to White’s $3,000 payment, Cariss secured only $300 for the generously gilded work. Because of this, it had been previously suggested that he may have been only the procurer of the frame.[1]

Friday, October 24, 2014

Protecting a Historic Shrine

With the opening of the Old Senate Chamber less than two months away, we are thrilled to soon have a historic room that will be filled with important original and recreated fine arts and furnishings. While we are eager to share many of the original artifacts with the public, much of the items on display in the Old Senate Chamber, and many other rooms in the Maryland State House, are irreplaceable, and the possibility of damage to the room or anything it contains is a constant worry. With such risks being taken, what sort of plan is there to protect the Maryland State House’s historic rooms?

The restoration of a room does not solely revolve around research and architectural discoveries, nor does the care of a room stop on opening day. Rather, many meetings are spent discussing preparation plans to protect the room from disaster and care for it on a regular basis. One aspect of preparation planning of particular importance for historic preservationists is how to protect your artifacts in the case of a fire.

2014_10_24_img1.jpg
The Old Senate Chamber restoration was prompted by plaster in the room falling off the walls due to nearly twenty layers of several different types of paint applied directly to the historic bricks. By collecting detailed records and working on preventative care of the room and its furnishings, we are taking measures to ensure this does not happen again. Maryland State Archives, April 2004.

Friday, October 10, 2014

Building the State House: Charles Wallace and the Old Senate Chamber

The answer to the question of who built the Maryland State House may be more complicated than you might imagine. While Joseph Horatio Anderson is commonly considered to be the original architect, and provided some of the first floor plans, he did not actually supervise the construction of the building. On June 20, 1771, the Maryland General Assembly contracted a somewhat unexpected individual to undertake the actual construction after Joseph Horatio Anderson had left. Charles Wallace, an Annapolitan, and one-third of the successful eighteenth-century mercantile firm, Wallace, Davidson & Johnson, agreed to take on what would become one of his most famous projects.[1]

2014_10_10_img2.jpg
Front elevation of the Maryland State House, by Charles Willson Peale, July 1788. Maryland State Archives, MSA SC 1051-2.

Friday, September 26, 2014

Receipts, Letters, and the News: How Archival Documents Crafted the Restored Old Senate Chamber

When most people think of an archives, the first thing to come to mind is often how the documents can be used as genealogical and legal resources. People rarely consider how these centuries of valuable documents can all be applied to restorations. While research within the Maryland State Archives, such as the Legacy of Slavery in Maryland, Maryland 400, and Brookeville projects, all use resources in the institution’s holdings to attempt to piece together the histories of people, the Old Senate Chamber restoration has similarly been using the same documents for years to piece together the history of a single room.

2014_10_3_img1.jpg
1825 header depicting the State House on the Maryland Gazette, one of the first published American newspapers. Many original editions of the paper are in the collection of the Maryland State Archives. Maryland Gazette, 21 April 1825, MSA SC 378-42.

With a room as old and historic as the Old Senate Chamber, shadows of architectural remains and photographs of the room in later periods do not suffice to explain all aspects of the room's original appearance. Instead, more unusual resources need to be used to flesh out the narrative. In the past, we have used probate and watermark analysis on documents to verify information and craft the lives of the key players in the Old Senate Chamber’s history.

Friday, September 12, 2014

228 Years Ago: The Annapolis Convention of 1786

Many visitors to Maryland's capital city don’t realize that Washington’s resignation and the ratification of the Treaty of Paris were not the only significant national events to take place in eighteenth-century Annapolis. On September 11 through September 14, 1786, delegates from Congress who were elected as commissioners descended upon the city once again in the hopes of meeting to determine the course of American government. While poor attendance prevented much progress at the Annapolis Convention of 1786, its impact on the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 and the resulting United States Constitution cannot be ignored.

A famous depiction of the Philadelphia Convention of 1787, where the Constitution was signed. This gathering is considered by many to be a direct result of the Annapolis Convention of 1786. Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy, 1940, courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol.

After the Revolutionary War, the United States government found itself without money, unable to even offer soldiers’ their pay, and in the midst of an economic depression. Furthermore, Congress found that it could take few measures to resolve this problem as the lack of a unified currency, among other things prevented ease in interstate state trading. Public unrest became a constant problem and though many rebellions were quickly squashed, Shays’ Rebellion in particular threatened the new government from August 1786 until February 1787. It was clear to delegates that something would need to be done.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Charles Willson Peale and the Seven Governors

Edwin White’s Washington Resigning His Commission and Charles Willson Peale’s Washington, Lafayette, and Tilghman at Yorktown are not the only valuable paintings under conservation for this restoration! In fact, a slew of portraits in the state art collection, dating from Peale’s 1774 portrait of William Pitt all the way to the 1970s campaign of crafting copies of portraits of many of Maryland’s founders have become candidates for conservation. Among the slew of fascinating stories attached to the art of the Maryland State House, there is one with a particularly long history. Between 1823 and 1825, Charles Willson Peale painted the portraits of seven of Maryland’s first governors, several of whom played prominent roles in Maryland’s Revolutionary War past and some even in Washington’s resignation!

2014_8_22_img3.jpg
Detail of Charles Willson Peale's portrait of John Hoskins Stone, 1824, while under conservation as part of the Old Senate Chamber restoration. Maryland State Archives, MSA SC 1545-1057.