Friday, October 23, 2015

Be Still My Heart: Raphaelle Peale by Alexandra K. Vicknair

Be Still My Heart: Raphaelle Peale

by Alexandra K. Vicknair
Historian and Art Historian
@2015
I first learned of Raphaelle Peale in an American art history class at UC Santa Barbara, circa…early 2000s. As a fan of tromp l’ oeil (trick-of-the-eye), it was his most famous work, Venus Rising from the Sea–A Deception (1822) that first caught my attention. However, Peale’s prolific and haunting still lifes are what truly captured my heart.
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Raphealle Peale, Venus Rising from the Sea–A Deception (1822)
Uh-oh, here it comes…history (of course)! Peale (1774-1825) came from an artistic family, headed by his father Charles Wilson Peale. Peale Sr. was a very famous artist and naturalist in his own right, and is most known for founding the Philadelphia Museum in the early 1800s.
C_W_Peale_-_The_Artist_in_His_Museum
Charles Wilson Peale (Self Portrait), An Artist in his Museum, 1822
Raphealle was the black sheep of the family and never fully achieved the success of his father or even his brother, Rembrandt, in the art world. So, like any good outcast, he purposefully painted still lifes, which were deemed one of the lowest forms of art at the time, to bother his father. (Wikipedia doesn’t even list him as an artist on Peale Sr.’s page, only his brother who painted portraits–deemed the highest caliber of art and skill–like their father.)
Raphaelle_Peale_-_Still_Life_with_Cake_-_Google_Art_Project
Raphealle Peale, Still Life with Cake, 1822
Peale utilized the medium of still lifes to reflect his life, and, therefore, they can essentially be viewed as his own form of self-portraiture. For example, he often played on his last name ‘Peale’ by showing peels of fruit. All still lifes are more than just pictures of food captured in time, and many reflect the mortality of life. Peale especially, who contracted gout in 1808 and was often very sickly, echoed this in his paintings. Images depicting moldy fruit, flies, and even transparent gauze remind the viewer of the transitory nature of life: all luscious fruit and delicious cakes will eventually rot.
Raphaelle_Peale_-_Still_Life_with_Oranges_-_Google_Art_Project
Still Life with Oranges, 1818
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Melons and Morning Glories, 1838
I am not sure why Raphealle Peale’s story and art captivate me so. Aside from the ethereal quality, there is also deep sadness and pain behind his works. The works reflect a longing for acceptance from our parents and society that we all can relate to. Anyone suffering with a chronic illness, or has learned first-hand the transitory nature of life, can also appreciate how powerful his still lifes truly are. The fact that he still does not get much credit as a painter (as when he was alive) also adds to the tragedy. Yet, for the few that know of him (and now you do too!) Rapehealle Peale makes an impression that lasts for a lifetime.
(Oh, what I wouldn’t give to have one of his gems on my wall!)
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Charles Wilson Peale, Portrait of Raphaelle Peale, 1822
(notice the still life in the background!)

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

FISH TALES SHOW OF MIXED MEDIA AND COLLAGE ART BY MARSHA BALIAN AND KATIE MCCANN NOVEMBER 14-JANUARY 9TH ARTBEAT SALON AND GALLERY

FISH TALES
SHOW OF MIXED MEDIA AND COLLAGE ART
BY MARSHA BALIAN AND KATIE MCCANN

NOVEMBER 14-JANUARY 9TH
ARTBEAT SALON AND GALLERY
1880 SOLANO AVENUE
BERKELEY


“Fish Tales” a show of mixed media and collage art by Marsha Balian and Katie McCann will be presented at the Artbeat Salon and Gallery November 14th through January 9th.    There will be a reception for the artists on Saturday November 14th at Artbeat, 1880 Solano Avenue in Berkeley from 6-8 p.m.  The event is free.

Self taught Oakland artist Marsha Balian admits resistance to following directions and prefers to invent her own techniques. Her work incorporates found objects and images combined with her own drawing and painting. Her art has a strong narrative quality, avoids what might be literal and attempts to engage the imagination of the viewer.  Humor is never far behind.

English artist Katie McCann currently lives and works in Berkeley.  Her intricate collages are inspired by childhood memories and some of the strange creatures she encountered in her imagination.  The drawings and images that she finds in her collection of old books are cut up and transformed into paper hybrids that surely could be found at the bottom of the garden amongst the beetles and the lilac.

For more information please contact either Marsha Balian: marshabalian@gmail.com, 510-601-1632 or Katie McCann: katiemccann.art@gmail.com, 408-215-8205

Orland Art Center Opens Nov 6 - Fields, Farms and Fantasy



November 6th through November 28th
"Fields, Farms, and Fantasy"
Three talented artists provide a bountiful variety for our Autumn exhibit. It features rice field vistas, farm lands nestled in the foothills of rugged 
mountain ranges, and playful ceramics that transform clay into fantasy.

Special Event:

Tuesday, November 10th, 2 to 4 p.m.
"Dolores Mitchell Commentary"
November artist Dolores Mitchell offers an entertaining and informative commentary on art, followed by a question and answer session.

Sunday, November 1 Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem The Cathedral of Christ the Light Oakland

Sunday, November 1 at 5:30pm the Cathedral Choir and Cathedral Consort will sing Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem in a Mass with Bishop Barber to commemorate all those who have passed away during the past year. 

http://staging.ctlcathedral.org/visit/concerts-and-events/faure-requiem-mass-2015

Come and commemorate all the faithfully departed.
Nov 1, 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

The Cathedral of Christ the Light
Office of Worship
510-893-4711 Ext. 242

All those who have lost a family member 
or friend during the past year are especially 
invited to attend this Commemoration Mass. The 
Cathedral Choir will sing Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem 
and Bishop Michael C. Barber, S.J. will be the celebrant. 

A special Remembrance Book will be available for everyone
 to enter their loved one’s name.  Prayers for the repose 
of their souls will be said during the Mass and in the 
Cathedral throughout the month of November.  

For more information, please contact the Office of Worship at 510-893-4711 Ext. 242.

 

“FISH TALES” SHOW OF MIXED MEDIA AND COLLAGE ART BY MARSHA BALIAN AND KATIE MCCANN NOVEMBER 14-JANUARY 9TH



“FISH TALES”
SHOW OF MIXED MEDIA AND COLLAGE ART
BY MARSHA BALIAN AND KATIE MCCANN

NOVEMBER 14-JANUARY 9TH
ARTBEAT SALON AND GALLERY
1880 SOLANO AVENUE
BERKELEY


“Fish Tales” a show of mixed media and collage art by Marsha Balian and Katie McCann will be presented at the Artbeat Salon and Gallery November 14th through January 9th.    There will be a reception for the artists on Saturday November 14th at Artbeat, 1880 Solano Avenue in Berkeley from 6-8 p.m.  The event is free.

Self taught Oakland artist Marsha Balian admits resistance to following directions and prefers to invent her own techniques. Her work incorporates found objects and images combined with her own drawing and painting. Her art has a strong narrative quality, avoids what might be literal and attempts to engage the imagination of the viewer.  Humor is never far behind.

English artist Katie McCann currently lives and works in Berkeley.  Her intricate collages are inspired by childhood memories and some of the strange creatures she encountered in her imagination.  The drawings and images that she finds in her collection of old books are cut up and transformed into paper hybrids that surely could be found at the bottom of the garden amongst the beetles and the lilac.

For more information please contact either Marsha Balian: marshabalian@gmail.com, 510-601-1632 or Katie McCann: katiemccann.art@gmail.com, 408-215-8205

End of release